Border Patrol Chief Says Criminal Illegal Aliens will No Longer be Returned to 'Sanctuary Cities'

“When sanctuary cities release these criminals back to the street, it increases the occurrence of preventable crimes – and more importantly, preventable victims.”

WASHINGTON, D.C. (Texas Insider Report) — “My job is to protect the United States and to secure the borders, not to get prosecutions. So we are deporting people that have active warrants because the state will not give back that person to us, and we have to pick: Federal Law or State Law,” said the new chief of the U.S. Border Patrol, Rodney Scott earlier this week, drawing a line in the agency's previous practice of turning illegal immigrant criminals over to Sanctuary City Jurisdictions that won’t promise to return the individuals after their local court cases have been resolved.

And, it really doesn’t matter what the alleged crime is either, said Scott, who was named U.S. Border Patrol chief in January.

“If they'll not give confirmation that they are going to return the individual, then we're not going to turn them over.

"We’ll prosecute them federally, then deport them. It doesn’t really matter the charge,” said Scott (at right with President Donald Trump while reviewing prototypes for his long-promised Border Wall.)

Referring to the illegal immigrant sanctuary state of California specifically, Scott said Border Patrol will deport an illegal immigrant if there is an outstanding warrant for arrest ,should the state refuse to return them.

In mid-February, ICE’s (Immigration & Customs Enforcement) Acting Director, Matthew Albence, announced that the agency would begin deploying law enforcement units from the southern border to sanctuary cities across the country as part of a new arrest operation.

Its the latest move in President Trump’s battle against localities that refuse to participate in illegal immigration law enforcement efforts.

The specially trained officers are being sent to various cities acros the U.S. to boost the enforcement power of local Immigration & Customs Enforcement officers. Additional agents are expected to be sent to New York City, Chicago, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Atlanta, Houston, Boston, New Orleans, Detroit and Newark, N.J.

The agency said the deployment comes in response to policies adopted by sanctuary cities, which have made it harder for immigration agents to do their jobs.

“As we have noted for years, in jurisdictions where we're not allowed to assume custody of illegal aliens from jails, our officers are forced to make at-large arrests of criminal aliens who have been released into communities” by local authorities, Albence, said.

“When sanctuary cities release these criminals back to the street, it increases the occurrence of preventable crimes – and more importantly, preventable victims,” said Albence.
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